Monday, July 30, 2012

Making Fresh Mayonnaise That Keeps


Once I realized I could make our own mayonnaise so easily, I felt pretty committed to never buying the store-bought kind again. We like doing things ourselves: We know what's in it - we never have to read food labels and wonder what they really mean - and we can make it exactly how we want. That storebought stuff was iffy, but I'm confident this raw, fresh mayonnaise is actually good for my family.

Olive oil mayonnaise has a stronger flavor than canola, soy, or safflower mayonnaise, but you get used to it pretty quickly, and even come to appreciate its flavor contribution on sandwiches. I found that using more egg and less oil in my recipes helps to neutralize the flavor so it's mild enough to work for all our mayonnaise needs. Of course we throw in garlic as well because garlic is delicious, and it's antimicrobial properties probably help fresh mayo keep longer as well. Feel free to use whatever oil you like for your homemade mayonnaise.

I'd tried making my own mayonnaise twice in the past: Once, successfully, from a Joy of Cooking recipe for aioli. It was great, but we didn't use it up soon enough and it went bad. The next time, in more recent years, my emulsification failed and, not knowing how to fix it, I dumped all those great ingredients because they were in an unusable slurry, and vowed to leave mayonnaise making to the professionals.

Well, I'm pretty much done leaving anything to the professionals. Every organic mayo we've found in stores has soy oil in it, or other iffy oils, and the only soy free mayonnaise choices are non-organic. We've been making do with store-bought for so long now because I thought it was beyond me to make a decent mayonnaise myself. Glad to be wrong!


Making It:

You can mix the ingredients with a food processor, a blender, or an immersion blender. Or, if you're way burlier than I am, use a whisk. Or a fork! Whatever you use, be prepared to stick with it for several minutes of intense mixing.

The secret to successful emulsification is to pour the oil in so painfully slowly; it should take minutes, and start with only the thinnest stream. I used to have Nik do this part because he's way more patient than I am. If it still fails to emulsify, or bind the egg and oil together, I've read that you can save it by blending in more eggs before adding the rest of the oil. I haven't had to try this, but I'm very glad to know there's a method to rescue a botched batch. 

Another trick that helps to get nice, spreadable mayonnaise is to blend it for several minutes, way longer than you might think necessary, until it's nice and thick. So, blending as you go, slowly pour up to 1/4 of the oil in with the eggs. Then stop adding oil and just blend until emulsification is obviously happening and the mixture is thick. Then you can more quickly add the rest of the oil. Never rush it, especially if you are just learning how.



Making It Last:

So, making fresh mayonnaise successfully is really not that hard, but most of us are used to a mayonnaise that keeps for longer than 4 days, and the fresh stuff should really be used up fairly quickly. However, longer term freshness can be achieved through lacto-fermentation!

Lacto-fermentation is a controlled process of growing certain beneficial micro-organisms, which inhibit the growth of others, thus ensuring a longer-lasting mayonnaise. When I make fermented mayonnaise it keeps for a few weeks, while the unfermented stuff keeps only a few days. The flavor of the mayonnaise doesn't change, to my palate anyway, during fermentation.

Fermenting mayonnaise involves simply adding some ginger bug, aka lacto-fermented soda starter, or kombucha, or some raw whey from cheesemaking if you have it. If you don't have any of these ingredients and you just want to make some fresh mayonnaise to eat within 4 days, you can use vinegar in the recipe instead. This recipe makes about 3 cups of mayonnaise.

How to:

Blend 3 eggs until creamy (use the best, freshest eggs you can get)
Ever so slowly, trickle in 2 c olive oil
Blend until soft peaks form, several minutes if needed
Add 2 cloves garlic
1 t sea salt
2 tb kombucha, ginger bug, whey, or apple cider vinegar (follow the above links to make your own)

Blend well and place in jar. Use within 3-5 days, or proceed with fermentation:

In this case, fermentation does not take long. Cap tightly and leave at room temp, out of direct light, for about 7 hours. This will preserve it for about 3 weeks.

Ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise, all lacto-fermented!

Shared at Pretty & Delicious, Pennywise, Greens, Tuesday's Table, TGIF, Weekly Creative, Fabulously Frugal, ReTreat, Tuned In, Project Inspired, Terrific, Mostly Homemade, Small Footprint, Full Plate, Natural Living, Love It, Fluster, Eco Kids, Try A New Recipe, Simple Meals, Craftionary, Showcase, Your Great Idea, What I Am Eating, Great Idea, Pin Me, Thriving, Wildcrafting, Creative HomeAcre, Clever Chicks, Mix It Up, Waste Not, Heart & Home, Backyard Farming Connection, Riverton, Extravaganza, Meatless, Raw Foods, Domestically Divine, Wonderful Food, Everything Home, Fill Those Jars, Pintastic, Gluten Free Friday, Adorned From Above, Live Love Laugh, Homestead Barn Hop, The Morris Tribe, Melt In Your Mouth, Sugar Free, Show & Tell, Seasonal Inspiration, Strut Your Stuff, Once Upon A Weekend, Country Momma Cooks, Weekend Wander, Fit & Fabulous, LHITS, Fun Party, Carnival Of Home Preserving, Farmer's Daughter, Foodie Friday, Freaky Friday, Frugal Food, Rural Thursday, Simple Lives, Thrifty Thursday, Green Resource, Eat Make Grow, Home Is Where The Heart Is, Healthy 2Day, Frugal Days, Allergy Free Wednesday, What's Cooking, Anti-Procrastination, Slightly Indulgent, Tiny Tip, Totally Tasty, Living Green, Hearth & Soul, Traditional Tuesday, Teach Me, Tasty Tuesday, Confessional, Time Out, I Did It,and Fat Tuesday.

81 comments:

  1. Hi, I just found your blog and love it! I am going thru your past posts and I have found them very inspiring. Great reading! Thank you!

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    1. That's so nice to hear, thanks Joyce!

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  2. Great idea but as a food scientist this scares me a little. Do you take the pH so you are certain it's acidic enough to ensure pathogens can't grow? It would be easy if there was a temperature fluctuation for the culture not to establish.

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    1. I do not measure pH, but that would be interesting. Want to try this recipe and see what you find out? I'd love to hear your results. I'm not sure what you mean by a temperature fluctuation, but it doesn't seem too likely on our kitchen countertop.
      I've done a lot of reading on traditional fermentation methods, and it's been a dying art in our culture ever since the advent of factory production and chemical preservatives. People have been using fermentation to preserve and enhance foods for thousands of years. I would not use junk eggs from factories in this recipe, because the likelihood of the presence of salmonella is much higher with unhealthy eggs.
      I think fermentation, to many of us, sounds scary until you give it a try.

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  3. I've been wanting a good mayonaise recipe! This is the first one that doesn't scare me :)

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    1. Thank you! Let me know how it goes.

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  4. I'm your 100th follower!! Congrats to ya friend! I feel so honored :) My husband is in the kitchen making homemade ketchup as we speak. We'll see how it turns out :/ Haha I'll have to try this homemade mayo to go along with it! Thanks for sharing :)

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    1. You can ferment your ketchup in the same way! It will end up a little less sweet, as the sugars are converted to lactic acid, but a little bit healthier. My kids love ketchup with nearly everything, and I feel much better about giving them fermented ketchup ;)
      Thanks for being my 100th! That is pretty amazing.

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  5. How fantastic! Must try fermenting it. :) Thanks for linking up to "I Did It!" Tuesday!

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  6. this is really interesting post. I was just reading about kombucha and really want to start making it as well as mayo. didn't know that you can use kombucha in preserving mayo. it actually sounds great. my family doesn't eat much mayo so it doesn't make sense to make a lot just to throw away most of it.

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    1. I used to not be much of a mayo person, but I find that it makes a great base for salad dressings, as well as a sandwich spread, and is essential in guacamole!

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  7. I make my mayo using a slightly refined (from a trusted source) coconut oil and another preferred oil, usually avocado, in an almost 1:1 mixture with the coconut oil being the larger portion. That provides my preservative part, good fats, and flavor. I love the green color!

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  8. Hi Mellow,

    This is actually one of the reasons I don't make mayo more often. I hate that it goes bad so fast and I don't want anyone to get sick. High five for a great post!

    We're having our inaugural Eat Make Grow Blog Hop. We are looking for folks to link up who want to share what they have been eating with their families, growing in their gardens or making with all their creative impulses. If you're interested, I hope you'll hop on over and link up a couple of your posts. It's a way for you to grow your readership and find other like minded mamas.

    Hope to see you there,

    Foy
    http://foyupdate.blogspot.com/2012/08/inaugural-eat-make-grow-blog-hop.html

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  9. I found you on Sorta Crunchy, I'm so glad I clicked on your link. I just made homemade mayonnaise for the first time last night, so this is perfect timing. I'm looking forward to your other lack-fermented recipes. Question, you make the mayonnaise and then lacto-ferment it? You could use what you want right away and lacto-ferment the rest?

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    1. Yes, you can definitely use it right away, and ferment whatever portion you want to use later.

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    2. Thanks, I see looking at my comment above that auto-correct has done it to me again. Obviously I meant lacto-ferment, not lack ferment. Do you have your ketchup recipe on here somewhere?

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    3. Gotcha ;)
      I haven't done homemade ketchup yet, because we never seem to run out of the huge backstock of organic ketchup I bought at a discount store a while ago. But what I do is ferment the storebought ketchup & mustard. I also do this with barbeque sauce, and any other condiments I think will benefit from fermenting. These sauces become less sweet, more tangy, and I think, better for you.

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    4. Oh...interesting. I don't lacto-ferment too often, do you just add some apple cider vinegar or whey to the jar and leave it out for a few hours?

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    5. I use kombucha or ginger bug for all my ferments, but whey or raw ACV should work in the same way. I use about 1/4 c starter per quart of liquid that I want to ferment, and I always transfer ketchup and things to glass jars before fermenting. Stir well and leave at room temp for a while. The longer you ferment it, the zingier it will be and the less sugar it will have. Mayo only takes 7 hours; it doesn't start with much sugar. Since ketchup is high in sugar to start, I give it 2-3 days on the counter before refrigeration. It really depends on what taste you're going for. Since we're trying to eliminate sugar, we feel good about fermenting things fully to convert as much of the sugars as we can.

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  10. found your blog with it's wealth of information through Country Momma Cooks. I joined and will be back to read more. thank you.

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    1. Thanks Lydia, so glad you like it!

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  11. Thank you for sharing this post, I've been wanting to try making our own mayo but was always a little leery about it going bad fast. I just subscribed to your blog, love it!
    annie @ montanasolarcreations

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  12. Thank you for your great post. Love your blog. We all need to decide to make things fresh ourselves. Additives, chemicals and questionable ingredients contribute to allergies, food intolerances and all kinds of nasty side effects. I am making more and more of the things I used to buy and find that I feel better physically and have a better sense of control over my food choices. Subscribing today!

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    1. Thank you! I think it's liberating to be able to make things ourselves, rather than having to rely on the honesty of food processors...

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  13. Homemade Mayonnaise is good stuff! I stopped buying store bought mayo and started making mine this year. Thank you for linking up at the Carnival of Home Preserving!

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  14. Hi Mellow, new here and wanted to ask a question. Can I use whey from yogurt that has live cultures? I use it for fermented pickles. Now as I write this I'm thinking yes but wanted to check. When I do my ketchup I don't use sugar but stevia and organic tomato paste with spices and apple cider vinegar but haven't fermented. Would it work to ferment this recipe because it's the best I've ever had but has a shorter shelf life.

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    1. Those are two good questions. I haven't used it myself, but I've always heard that you can scoop out the liquid from active yogurt in any recipe that calls for whey. I prefer to use kombucha or ginger bug, personally, because I like the flavors better. I would think that raw apple cider vinegar would also work as a starter, but I've never uesd it for fermentation.
      Fermenting ketchup made from stevia- I would think it would take a lot less time than ketchup made with sugar. I ferment my ketchup for 3 days, but stevia ketchup might only need one day. I would love to hear how it goes for you!

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    2. Leslie, I couldn't reply, for some reason to your post the other day, but just commented on August 8 and again today, August 9 as an anonymous poster.

      Mellow, I've never tried kombucha and have never heard of ginger bug, but might at some point. I do want to make homemade ketchup...the ones I've found call for fish sauce, which doesn't sound very good, but would probably be fine mixed in with everything else.

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    3. I think a little bit of fish sauce goes a long way, but it adds a nice complexity to the flavor of whatever you put it in. The only think I have used it for is a Thai soup; the ketchup recipe I've used in the past (which I can't find!) didn't call for it.

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    4. I'll definitely get some fish sauce for my ketchup...and start using "outsider" instead of anonymous. I was afraid of using my real name because I was afraid I'd get harsh comments about not using the right oils (refined instead of virgin, etc.) It seems like everyone on here has been nicer than on some of the other sites I've been on before.

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    5. That's funny, and kind of sad. I guess everyone on these blogs wants everyone else to be healthy, so their hearts are in the right place even if their comments seem harsh. I'm glad you haven't experienced that here. I know I'm always learning something new, and changing how I eat, based on new-to-me information, often enough that I could never judge someone for eating differently than I do. There is so much information out there, and each of us have different needs. There is no one right way ;)

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  15. Thank you for sharing!
    I really enjoyed learning about lacto fermentation and I wil defiantly give it a go! I was wondering though ; why is soy oil bad?

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    1. http://www.utne.com/2007-07-01/Science-Technology/The-Dark-Side-of-Soy.aspx
      Here's an article from Utne Reader on The Dark Side of Soy. Here's the gist: soy, how we generally eat it, is a highly processed food. It's been marketed to us as beneficial, but in fact it's really just very cheap to produce, and health claims are misleading. Traditionally, soy was eaten in small quantities, and always fermented. Soy oil and soy protein are pretty indigestible, and their prevalence in our food products could be why so many people are developing sensitivities to soy these days.
      In our family, we avoid soy except in traditional fermented forms like tofu, tempeh, miso, and nama shoyu. The oils I feel comfortable using regularly are olive & coconut oils, butter, and the fat from cooking meats. We also use real milks, raw and fresh, rather than soy milk, and real cheese rather that a soy cheese product.

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  16. Great post! I really enjoyed reading about your experience making homemade mayonnaise, and it is very interesting to read how lacto-fermentation extends the time that it keeps for. Thank you for sharing this wonderful post with the Hearth and Soul hop.

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  17. I'm up to my ears in whey. I'm going to go home and try this.Thanks for the post!

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  18. Love this! I have made homemade mayo, but end up throwing out what's left after a few days...I'll be making yours from now on! Thank you for sharing at Fit and Fabulous Fridays!!

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  19. I tried unsuccessfully to reply to the question about using whey from yogurt to make homemade mayo...that's what I use every time I make mine. I read from wherever I got the recipe that it makes the mayo last about 6 weeks, the batch I have now has lasted over a month. The other batches I have thrown out because the olive oil taste was too strong.

    I use 1/2 coconut oil and 1/2 cup olive oil and always use unpasteurized eggs bought from a friend who has chickens. To be honest I've gone from the virgin coconut oil to an organic refined kind, and also with the olive oil because of it tasting too strong, switched to Pompeian's Extra Light Tasting brand. I'm hoping that it's still safer to use than soy and all that other stuff added to store-bought mayo.

    I used to use a regular blender on the slow setting to make mayo, dripping the oil in really slow, then I read somewhere that if you use an immersion/stick blender that you can put everything in a mason jar and just use the blender and it would work the same. I tried it and I believe it makes a better consistency mayo than using the blender.

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    1. That is fantastic to know that you can just dump it all in and immersion-blend away, and it will end up a good consistency. I will definitely try that next time.
      Have you ever heard of bacon fat mayonnaise? I've never tried it, but I know my family would love the flavor. I agree, the extra virgin olive oil has such a strong flavor. It took some getting used to, but it's completely replaced storebought for us, and we've all gotten used to the flavor.
      My family isn't as fond of the coconut flavor as I am, so I have both kinds of coconut oil that I use- the refined kind when I don't want my family's meal to taste coconutty. If it were up to me, it would all be virgin coconut oil because I absolutely love the flavor ;) I've never used it for mayonnaise because I didn't want to deal with softening it first.
      Thanks for the tip about using whey from yogurt, that is great. Do you use the same proportions as I do in this recipe, about 2 tb whey to 3 c total liquid? Do you set it out to ferment at room temp for a while, or just mix and store in the fridge right away? I'm glad to hear there is someone else out there making fermented mayonnaise!

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    2. Bacon fat mayo sounds delicious, I know my son would love it! I like the virgin coconut oil but my family doesn't so I use the refined kind in this recipe.
      Here is the recipe that I modified from a recipe, that I believe came from cheeseslave.com:

      All ingredients at room temperature. I just put them into a quart mason jar since I use an immersion blender. Like I mentioned before, I don't do the slow method of pouring the oils in. I might experiment with using more coconut oil, less olive oil next time too. I would use all coconut oil but I read that if you use all coconut oil that it will get hard in the fridge and that the olive oil keeps it the right consistency.
      Lacto-Fermented Homemade Mayo
      3 unpasteurized eggs
      1/2 cup coconut oil
      1-1/2 cups olive oil
      (original recipe calls for 1-1/2 cups to 2 cups of olive oil with no coconut oil)
      1 Tablespoon lemon juice
      (the original recipe calls for 3-5 teaspoons of lemon juice or wine vinegar, but since I had both, I used both in my recipe, in the proportions I've listed)
      2 teaspoon wine vinegar
      1/2 teaspoon sea salt
      1/4 teaspoon brown mustard
      3 Tablespoons liquid whey (drained from homemade yogurt)
      I looked on the back of my old Kraft mayo jar to see what was in it, since I liked it, so after doing that, sprinkled onion powder and garlic powder covering the surface of everything in the jar. I add more, if after mixing, it needs more seasoning.

      Use your immersion blender until you get a mayo consistency.

      Put a lid on the jar, leave on kitchen counter for several hours or overnight, then put in the fridge. I didn't leave mine out overnight, but only for a few hours. The last time I did this I didn't mix it long enough and a few minutes after I put it on the counter I could see it separating, so mixed it a little more and it was fine.

      Without whey, this recipe will last about 2 weeks. With whey, this will keep in the fridge for several months.

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    3. Awesome, I will be trying this recipe this weekend. Thanks so much for taking the time to post it!

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    4. I might add, and it might have already been mentioned before, that all ingredients need to be at room temperature. I've read from others, of batches not working out well because the ingredients were cold. I set my eggs & whey out about an hour before I make this recipe. I've only used unpasteurized eggs, I don't know if it you can do this with the store-bought eggs.

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    5. I'm excited to hear how your mayo came out. I hope that you like it. I'm waiting for a delivery of fresh eggs to come tomorrow and will make a new batch of mayo.

      I might experiment this time with using more coconut oil and less olive oil. I would use all coconut oil if it would keep it's consistency and not harden in the fridge! If I find the right proportion I'd like to go back to using virgin olive oil again. It's strange, but I love Trader Joe's "Trader Giotto's 100% Italian President's Reserve Extra Virgin Olive Oil" on my salads because it's not as strong as other the other extra virgin olive oils that I've tried. I believe that the first recipe of mayo that I made had 50% extra virgin olive oil/50% virgin coconut oil but the olive oil that I used back then had too strong of a taste.

      I should have mentioned this earlier, but if you set the eggs and whey out for an hour before making mayo, you could also, at this time, set your measuring cup of coconut oil in a bowl of hot water to have it soften while you wait. I'd have to write this in my recipe to remember to do it!

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  20. Have you read "nourishing traditions"?
    I make my mayo via her recipe, and it always keeps for AGES. i always used juice from my Meyer lemon tree, which the state of California stole from me when i moved :( and the amount of whey specified in N.T. By adding the whey right into the egg/garlic/whatever else mixture, then adding the oil (super slowly!) i would get well emulsified and long lasting mayo. I left my jar of mayo, covered, out on the counter all day and then put into the fridge. this allowed the lacto fermentation to do its magic.

    please let me know if you have other questions about hte n.t. book - or just get it yourself, it's awesome!
    Miranda
    pocket pause . com

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    1. Yes, I love Nourishing Traditions. I don't like the taste of whey, at least the goat milk whey that I've tried Sally Fallon's recipes with, but I find that the ginger bug or kombucha works for just about any recipe that calls for whey. Reading that book completely changed how I cook!

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  21. Wow I'm going to have to try this..........Thanks for linking it up @ CountryMommaCooks : )

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  22. Thanks for linking to our first Eat Make Grow Blog Hop! You inspired me to try making my own lacto-fermented Sauerkraut. I'm thinking my 2nd generation German grandmother would be proud!

    We are already on to Blog Hop #2. I hope you'll come and link to that one as well. Feel free to link to any older posts if you think they are timely and pertinent.

    - Foy
    http://foyupdate.blogspot.com/2012/08/eat-make-grow-thursday-blog-hop-2.html

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  23. Very interesting & very helpful - Thanks! I'm your newest follower from "Adorned from Above" blog hop - I would love a "follow-back" if you get a chance: http://godsgrowinggarden.com/
    Thanks
    Angie

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  24. This looks great! My grandma always made her own homemade mayonaise and I remember loving it so much. Thanks for joining the Homesteading Link Up and stop by to join in this week!http://farmersdaughterct.com/2012/08/17/homesteading-link-up-and-sun-dried-cherry-tomatoes/

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  25. So awesome! I pinned your recipe! Thanks for linking up with our Gluten Free Fridays recipe party! I hope to see you next Friday too! :)
    Cindy

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  26. I love mayo, and this sandwich looks delicious. I just made one the other day. Thank you so much for sharing with Wednesdays Adorned From Above Link Party last week. This weeks Link Party is opened at http://www.adornedfromabove.com/2012/08/tangerine-toner-and-wednesdays-adorned.html
    Hope to see you there.
    Debi Bolocofsky
    Adorned From Above
    www.adornedfromabove.com

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  27. I cant wait to try making my own mayo! Thanks for sharing the recipe! I am your newest follower and I would love for you to visit my site and join as well! :)

    riversrecipereview.blogspot.com

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  28. Can this be made with store bought organic eggs? I don't have access to fresh eggs. I'm recently gluten free and soy free and a bit overwhelmed with the new lifestyle but really learning a lot and appreciate all the info. Raw eggs kinda scare me.

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    1. Raw eggs used to scare me too! One thing I learned that made me feel better about using them was how very rare salmonella poisoning from eggs is. This was years ago, and I don't remember the specifics, but from what I remember, salmonella is much more prevalent in the raw meat of chickens, so contamination from raw chicken is more dangerous. The eggs from healthy hens are also way less likely to have high levels of salmonella than the eggs of hens living in sickly conditions. I did start using raw eggs before I had my own hens, so I just would buy the most expensive, free range organic eggs I could find. I just don't trust the others!
      Another thing about salmonella, it's one of those things that is ubiquitious; it's everywhere, and it's only when we get exposed to large amounts, or when our own immune system isn't functioning properly that we get sick. With that in mind, if you do end up using standard eggs, I would be careful about who eats them- don't feed them to someone elderly or an infant, who have a harder time fighting bacteria off.
      That being said, we eat this all the time and I consider it perfectly safe when made with wholesome eggs. Just do your research and decide for yourself!

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  29. Thanks for this. I've been meaning to start making my own and this is good info.
    I do have a question tho...how can you tell when the mayo has gone bad?
    Thanks!

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    1. The only thing that has happened to mine is getting some mold growing along the side of the jar, perhaps where it got something else in it. Besides possible mold, I would just make sure that it always smells good.

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  30. Growing up, I always hated mayonnaise. A while back I decided to make my own and see if it was better than anything I'd tried before. And it was amazing! I couldn't believe how good it tasted with my chickens' freshly laid eggs. I have tried using an immersion blender several times with mixed success, and have found that a whisk is best for me. It does take longer and use a lot of elbow grease, but the mayo turns out great every time.

    Thanks for the tip on making it keep longer! I'll have to remember that for the future.

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  31. Soy is so insidious, isn't it?! Thanks so much for sharing it on Waste Not Want Not Wednesday, I’ve pinned it.
    Also, I’d love for you to link up your blog to my new OAS & GF Bloggers page, a place to connect with other bloggers who sometimes write about being gluten free or having oral allergy syndrome : ) http://www.poorandglutenfree.blogspot.com/p/links.html

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  32. This may be the secret for me. Mayo seems to be one of those things I don't get to making and the impetus is low if it does not keep. I will be saving this recipe and would be even happier if you had a pinterest button for it.
    Thanks for sharing at Wildcrafting Wednesday.

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    1. Thank you! I do have a pinterest button, but it's halfway down the left side of the screen. I should have it someplace more obvious and easier to find!

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  33. Looks awesome! Thanks so much for sharing on The Creative HomeAcre Hop!
    Hope to see you again tomorrow at:
    http://www.theselfsufficienthomeacre.com/2013/05/thecreativehomeacrehom17.html

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  34. I went back to store bought mayo just because of the issue of shelf-life. Thanks for this post, very helpful!! :)

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  35. Love this! There's a new link-up party going on at One Sharendipity Place and we would love for you to join us! Here's the link if you want to come: http://thet2women.com/welcome-to-one-sharendipity-place-link-up-4/

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  36. Thanks so much for sharing your awesome recipe with Full Plate Thursday. Have a great weekend and hope to see you soon!
    Miz Helen

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  37. This mayo sounds amazing but I can't help looking at the top picture and thinking "man that bread looks good!" Do you make your own? I've looked around the blog for a recipe but haven't found one.

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    1. That bread IS really good! I make things like biscuits & cornbread, but have never managed a great sandwich bread. Yet! We get a free loaf of fresh bread every week through our CSA, so I haven't had much need to experiment with making my own. I do have my whole grain, sourdough biscuit recipe on the blog.

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  38. I was having some issues making raw mayo, I've made it by hand with just yolks that are heated lots of times no problem but doing it raw by hand just wasn't working with a whole raw egg so I went to the internet. Anyway, I did get it to work but in the process I read this post and wanted to ferment it too! I just added a tbs of yogurt since there wasn't much whey in it. Its some plain yogurt from a coop and it obviously has a strong active bacterial population, It should work just fine right?

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    1. Gosh, I would think yogurt would be as good of a starter as whey.

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    2. I thought so too! I just tasted and it still tastes good, it might be too soon to say but I think it worked :)

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  39. Wow! I just made this Mayo with Kambucha and it worked beautifully. Thank you for being so thorough and explaining things so us beginners can get started! So excited to keep fermenting! Thank you again!

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  40. I loved your recipe! I used store bought Kambucha and it worked great. Thank you so much! I was wondering though what difference it makes using the whole egg or just yolks??

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    1. I actually don't know what difference it makes! I've always done whole egg, because then I don't have whites leftover. I like using the whole food whenever possible in general; I just feel like it's more healthful. But as far as how the mayo turns out, that sounds like it would be a good experiment!

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  41. Hi there,
    I make water kefir at home; gave up kombucha making a little while ago as I prefer the taste of water kefir...
    Can I use water kefir instead to make longer lasting fermented mayo?
    Also, does the taste go off significantly when it goes bad?
    Thanks in advance! :)

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    1. Yes! I also make water kefir now (though I still make kombuch as well) and I'm sure it would work as effectively as kombucha for preserving mayonnaise. Thanks for asking!
      When the mayonnaise goes bad (and I have had it happen if I forget about it in the fridge for too long) it visibly molds.

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  42. Sorry if I'm being a bit dense here, but does apv work as a fermenting agent or does it just make nice mayonnaise?

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    1. No apologies! Sorry it took a month to get to your question, I've been offline. ACV that's "active" or "with the mother" is alive and definitely works as a fermenting agent. I think they do sell ACV that's been processed and is no longer alive, so watch out for that.

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